Freedom And Capitalism Essays On Christian Politics And Economics

 

This index has been updated through issue 60. For the most recent issues, see here.


Surveys of thought within theological traditions:

DU PLESSIS, S.A. "How Can You Be a Christian and an Economist? The Meaning of the Accra Declaration for Today" 56 (Fall 2010) 65-80.

FFORESTFACH, Lord Griffiths of. "Caritas in Veritate: Pope Benedict's Two Cheers for Globalization" 56 (Fall 2010) 111-124.

PAYNE, Daniel P. and Christopher Marsh.

Sub-disciplinary fields:

BOUGHTON, Duncan, David Mather, Christopher B. Barrett, Rui Benfica, Danilo Abdula, David Tschirley, and Benedito Cunguara “Market Participation by Rural Households in a Low-Income Country: As Asset-Based Approach Applied to Mozambique” 50 (Fall 2007) 64-101

BROWN, Douglas R., Isabel Gomes, John Morton, Tony Rinaudo. "Pastoralism and Poverty: Research Informing Practice." (Part of a symposium entitled "Research in Partmership with Faith-Based NGOs.") 52 (Fall 2008) 15-31.

CRABB, Peter R. and Timothy Keller “A Test of Portfolio Risk in Microfinance Institutions” 47/48 (Spring/Fall 2006) 25-40

McNAMERA, Paul, Joel Cuffy, Anil Cherian, Saira Paulose. "Research Partnerships Between Faith-Based NGOs and Academic Researchers: An Example from Food Security and HIV and AIDS Research in Delhi, India." (Part of a symposium entitled "Research in Partmership with Faith-Based NGOs.") 52 (Fall 2008) 50-65.

MOCHRIE, Robert I. "The Emergence fo Fair Trade as a Development Channel." 59 (Spring 2012) 1-22.

RICHARDSON, J. David, and James K.A. Smith. "Economists, Theologians, and Globalization: an Exchange. 56 (Fall 2010) 5-63.

RICHARDSON, J. David. "Globalization and the Common Good: An Economist's Account for Skeptical Scholars" 56 (Fall 2010) 21-46.

RICHARDSON, J. David. "Globalization and the Common Good: An Initial Response to Smith" 56 (Fall 2010) 53-56.

RICHARDSON, J. David. "A Closing Response to Smith" 56 (Fall 2010) 61-64.

RUBEN, Ruerd and Koos van Eyk “The Dynamics of the Global Fruit and Vegetable Chains: Export-Oriented Agriculture as a Pro-Poor Strategy?” 50 (Fall 2007) 42-63

SMITH, James K.A. "The 'Ecclesial' Critique of Globalization: Rethinking the Questions" 56 (Fall 2010) 5-20.

SMITH, James K.A. "Evaluating the Good: A Reply to Richardson" 56 (Fall 2010) 47-52.

SMITH, James K.A. "Missing an Opportunity that Never Was? A Final Response to Richardson" 56 (Fall 2010) 57-60.

THORNTON, Jeremy and Phil Thornton “Agency and Incentives in International Development Partnership” 47/48 (Spring/Fall 2006) 1-24

WILSON, Paul N. "The Human soul: A Missing Link in Economic Development Education" 57 (Spring 2011) 25-46.


Economics, Theoloy, and Ethics:

ANDERSON, John E. "A Biblical and Economic Analysis of Jubilee Property Provisions." 46 (Fall 2005) 25-41.

BEED, Clive. "Jesus and Competition." 45 (Spring 2005) 41-57.

BOETTKE, Peter J. “From Approximate Value Neutrality to Real Value Relevance: Economics, Political Economy, and the Moral Ecology of the Market Order” 49 (Spring 2007) 19-34

BROOKS, Arthur.

DU PLESSIS, S.A. "How Can You Be a Christian and an Economist? The Meaning of the Accra Declaration for Today" 56 (Fall 2010) 65-80.

MONSMA, George N., Jr. “A Useful Framework for the Discussion of the Morality of Markets” 49 (Spring 2007) 1-9

NOELL, Edd S. and Kurt C. Schaefer. "Contract Theory, Distributive Justice, and the Hebrew Sabbatical." 45 (Spring 2005) 1-19.

RICHARDSON, J. David, and James K.A. Smith. "Economists, Theologians, and Globalization: an Exchange. 56 (Fall 2010) 5-63.

RICHARDSON, J. David. "Globalization and the Common Good: An Economist's Account for Skeptical Scholars" 56 (Fall 2010) 21-46.

RICHARDSON, J. David. "Globalization and the Common Good: An Initial Response to Smith" 56 (Fall 2010) 53-56.

RICHARDSON, J. David. "A Closing Response to Smith" 56 (Fall 2010) 61-64.

SCHAEFER, Kurt C. and Edd S. Noell. "Contract Theory, Distributive Justice, and the Hebrew Sabbatical." 45 (Spring 2005) 1-19.

SMITH, James K.A. "The 'Ecclesial' Critique of Globalization: Rethinking the Questions" 56 (Fall 2010) 5-20.

SMITH, James K.A. "Evaluating the Good: A Reply to Richardson" 56 (Fall 2010) 47-52.

SMITH, James K.A. "Missing an Opportunity that Never Was? A Final Response to Richardson" 56 (Fall 2010) 57-60.

VAN TILL, Kent. "A Theologian's Response to Lunn." 59 (Spring 2012) 59-61.

WEBB, Bruce G. “The Quest for ‘Mutual Understanding’: A Response to The Moral Ecology of Markets, 49 (Spring 2007) 10-18

WEBB, Bruce G. “Is There Value-Added in Christian Scholarship? The Case of Unemployment” 47/48 (Spring/Fall 2006) 41-58

WILBER, Charles K. “Can a Christian Be an Economist?” 47/48 (Spring/Fall 2006) 59-86


Poverty in North America:





History of Thought/Methodology:

ANDERSON, John E. "A Biblical and Economic Analysis of Jubilee Property Provisions." 46 (Fall 2005) 25-41.

BEED, Clive and Cara Beed.

BEED, Clive and Cara Beed. "The Nature of Biblical Economic Principle, and Its Critics." 59 (Spring 2012) 31-58.

BOETTKE, Peter J. “From Approximate Value Neutrality to Real Value Relevance: Economics, Political Economy, and the Moral Ecology of the Market Order” 49 (Spring 2007) 19-34

ELZINGA, Kenneth G. and Matthew R. Givens.

NOELL, Edd S. and Kurt C. Schaefer. "Contract Theory, Distributive Justice, and the Hebrew Sabbatical." 45 (Spring 2005) 1-19.

PAYNE, Daniel P. and Christopher Marsh.

SCHAEFER, Kurt C. and Edd S. Noell. "Contract Theory, Distributive Justice, and the Hebrew Sabbatical." 45 (Spring 2005) 1-19.

TIEMSTRA, John. "Notes from the Revolution: Principles of a New Economics." 54 (Fall 2009) 19-29.

WEBB, Bruce G. “The Quest for ‘Mutual Understanding’: A Response to The Moral Ecology of Markets, 49 (Spring 2007) 10-18

WEBB, Bruce G. “Is There Value-Added in Christian Scholarship? The Case of Unemployment” 47/48 (Spring/Fall 2006) 41-58

YUENGERT, Andrew M. "Elements of a Christian Critique of Consumer Theory." 54 (Fall 2009) 31-56.





Other Fields:

ANDERSON, John E. "A Biblical and Economic Analysis of Jubilee Property Provisions." 46 (Fall 2005) 25-41.

BEED, Clive. "Jesus and Competition." 45 (Spring 2005) 41-57.

BEED, Clive and Cara Beed.

BLOMBERG, Craig. "Economics and American Theological Curricula: What's Missing." 58 (Fall 2011) 20-23.

BOETTKE, Peter J. “From Approximate Value Neutrality to Real Value Relevance: Economics, Political Economy, and the Moral Ecology of the Market Order” 49 (Spring 2007) 19-34

BOETTKE, Peter. "Religion and Economics." (Part of the symposium on "The Economics of Religion") 46 (Fall 2005) 14-18.

CALOMIRIS, Charles W. "A Spiritual Response to the Financial Crisis? Making Decisions for the Really Long Run." 58 (Fall 2011) 59-71.

DELEIRE, Thomas, Thomas D. Jeitschko, Seamus O'Connell, and Rowena A. Pecchenino. "Love Thy Neighbor as Thyself: Community Formation and the Church." 55 (Spring 2010) 19-56.

HUNGERMAN, Daniel. "Christian Scholarship in Economics at American Research Universities." 58 (Fall 2011) 8-10.

IANNACCONE, Laurence R.

JEITSCHKO, Thomas D., Seamus O'Connell, and Rowena A. Pecchenino.

MARTINEZ, Gabriel X.

NEAL, Derek. "Comments on the Economics of Religion." (Part of the symposium on "The Economics of Religion") 46 (Fall 2005) 10-13.

NOELL, Edd S. and Kurt C. Schaefer. "Contract Theory, Distributive Justice, and the Hebrew Sabbatical." 45 (Spring 2005) 1-19.

NORTH, Charles M and Beck A. Taylor "The Biblical Underpinnings of Tit-for-Tat: Scriptural Insights into Axelrod's The Evolution of Cooperation" 44 (Fall 2004) 1-25.

OSLINGTON, Paul. "Symposium Chair's Introduction." 58 (Fall 2011) 1-3.

OSLINGTON, Paul. "The Significance of the Economics of Religion for the Engagement of Economics with Christian Theology." 58 (Fall 2011) 16-19.

POLLITT, Michael. "What Do Economists and Theologians Have to Say to Each Other? The International Situation." 58 (Fall 2011) 11-15.

SCHAEFER, Kurt C. “Benchmarking Scholarship in Economics” 47/48 (Spring/Fall 2006) 87-95

SCHAEFER, Kurt C. and Edd S. Noell. "Contract Theory, Distributive Justice, and the Hebrew Sabbatical." 45 (Spring 2005) 1-19.

STARK, Rodney. "Early Christianity: Opiate of the Privileged?" 54 (Fall 2009) 1-18.

STEEN, Todd P. "Is There an Earnings Premium for Catholic Women? Evidence from the NLS Youth Cohort." 45 (Spring 2005) 21-39.


Essay/Viewpoint articles:

VIEWPOINT: "Looking Back, Looking Forward: Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Remembrances of the Association of Christian Economists" 52 (Fall 2008) 1-10.

BARRETT, Christopher B. VIEWPOINT: "Looking Back, Looking Forward: Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Remembrances of the Association of Christian Economists" 52 (Fall 2008) 1-10.

VIEWPOINT: "Looking Back, Looking Forward: Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Remembrances of the Association of Christian Economists" 52 (Fall 2008) 1-10.

CAMPBELL, William F. VIEWPOINT: "Looking Back, Looking Forward: Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Remembrances of the Association of Christian Economists" 52 (Fall 2008) 1-10.

VIEWPOINT: "Looking Back, Looking Forward: Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Remembrances of the Association of Christian Economists" 52 (Fall 2008) 1-10.

GRINOLS, Earl L. VIEWPOINT: "Looking Back, Looking Forward: Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Remembrances of the Association of Christian Economists" 52 (Fall 2008) 1-10.

VIEWPOINT: "Looking Back, Looking Forward: Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Remembrances of the Association of Christian Economists" 52 (Fall 2008) 1-10.

MASON, John D. VIEWPOINT: "Looking Back, Looking Forward: Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Remembrances of the Association of Christian Economists" 52 (Fall 2008) 1-10.

RICHARDSON, J. David VIEWPOINT: "Looking Back, Looking Forward: Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Remembrances of the Association of Christian Economists" 52 (Fall 2008) 1-10.

SCHAEFER, Kurt C. “Benchmarking Scholarship in Economics” 47/48 (Spring/Fall 2006) 87-95

WATERMAN,A.M.C. VIEWPOINT: "Looking Back, Looking Forward: Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Remembrances of the Association of Christian Economists" 52 (Fall 2008) 1-10.


ABADEER, Adel.

ANDERSON, John E. Review of Economics in Christian Perspective: Theory, Policy and Life Choices by Victor V. Claar and Robim J. Klay, 50 (Fall 2007) 122-126


BARRETT, Christopher B.

BARRETT, Christopher B. Review of The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities for Our Time by Jeffrey D. Sachs. 46 (Fall 2005) 43-49.

BERGSTROM, John C. Review of The New Holy Wars: Economic Religion vs. Enviornmental Religion in Contemporary America. by Robert H. Nelson. 57 (Spring 2011) 65-67.

BERNHOFEN, Daniel M. Review of Trade Liberalization: Fears and Facts by Robert A. Togowsky, Linda A. Linkins and Karl S. Tsuji. 41 (Spring 2003) 32-34.

BLACK, Robert A. Review of Property for People, Not for Profit: Alternatives to the Global Tyranny of Capital by Ulrich Duchrow and Franz J. Hinkelammert. 45 (Spring 2005) 63-71.

BRUNGER, Scott. Review of Great Commission Companies: The Emerging Role of Business in Missions by Steve Rundle and Tom Steffen. 43 (Spring 2004) 16-17.

BURKE, Joseph Anthony. Review of The Good That Business Does by Robert G. Kennedy, 52 (Fall 2008) 90-93.

CAMPBELL, William F. Review of Political Economy and Christian Theology since the Enlightenment: Essays in Intellectual History by A. M. C. Waterman, 49 (Spring 2007) 71-76.

CARDEN, Art. Review of Economic Facts and Fallacies by Thomas Sowell, 52 (Fall 2008) 85-89.

CLAAR, Vistor. Review of Economic Theory and Christian Belief by Andrew Britton and Peter Sedgwick. 45 (Spring 2005) 76-78.

DEAN, Judith M.

DE VRIES, Barent A. Review of De gereformeedden (The Reformed People of the Netherlands) by Agnes Amelink. 41 (Spring 2003) 34.

ESSENBURG, Timothy J.

FINN, Daniel. Review of Looking Beyond the Individualism and Homo Economicus of Neoclassical Economics: A Collection of Original Essays Dedicated to the Memory of Peter L. Danner, Our Friend and Colleague. Edward J. O'Boyle, ed. 59 (Spring 2012) 82-85.

FOSHEE, Andrew. Review of The Church and the Market: A Catholic Defense of the Free Economy by Thomas E. Woods, Jr. 47/48 (Spring/Fall 2006) 147-152.

GRINOLS, Earl L. Review of Who Really Cares: The Surprising Truth About Compassionate Conservatism—America’s Charity Divide, Who Gives, Who Doesn’t, and Why It Matters by Arthur C. Brooks, 49 (Spring 2007) 50-55

GRINOLS, Earl, Review of The Victory of Reason: How Christianity Led to Freedom, Capitalism, and Western Success by Rodney Stark, 47/48 (Spring/Fall 2006) 106-110

GWIN, C. Review of "Biblical Games: Game Theory and the Hebrew Bible," by S. Brams. 42 (Fall 2003) 63-64.

HALTEMAN, Jim. Review of Alternatives to Economics: Christian Socio-Economic Perspectives by Clive Beed and Cara Beed, 50 (Fall 2007) 127-131

HALTEMAN, Jim. Review of Cash Values: Money and the Erosion of Meaning in Today's Society by Craig M. Gay. 46 (Fall 2005) 50-53.

HALTEMAN, Jim. Review of A Short History of Distributive Justice by Samuel Fleischacher. 46 (Fall 2005) 67-69.

HAMERSMA, Sarah, Review of The Decline of the Secular University: Why the Academy Needs Religion by C. John Sommerville, 47/48 (Spring/Fall 2006) 111-114

HAMMOND, Daniel J. Review of Redeeming Economics: Rediscovering the Missing Element. by John D. Mueller. 59 (Spring 2012) 73-77.

HARTROPP, Andrew. Review of Having: Property and Possession in Religious and Social Life by William Schweiker and Charles Mathewes. 45 (Spring 2005) 72-75.

HARTROPP, Andy. Review of Power and Poverty: Divine and Human Rule in a World of Need. by Dewi Hughes 54 (Fall 2009) 133-136.

HAVENS, Rebecca A. Review of The Redemption of Love: Rescuing Marriage and Sexuality from the Economics of a Fallen World by Carrie A. Miles, 47/48 (Spring/Fall 2006) 121-126

HAYMOND, Jeff, Zach Weston, and Kyle Wilcox. Review of This Time is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly. by Carmen M. Reinhart and Kenneth S. Rogoff. 58 (Fall 2011) 83-89.

HEAD, Tom. Review of The Real Wealth of Nations: Creating a Caring Economics by Riane Eisler, 51 (Spring 2008) 101-104

HESLAM, Peter S. Review of Less Than Two Dollars a Day: A Christian View of World Poverty and the Free Market by Kent A. Van Til, 52 (Fall 2008) 75-78.

HILL, P.J.

HILL, P.J. Review of The Myth of the Rational Voter: Why Democracies Choose Bad Policies by Bryan Caplan, 52 (Fall 2008) 66-70.

HOKSBERGEN, Roland. Review of Global Neighbors: Christian Faith and Moral Obligation in Today's Economy. by Douglas A. Hicks and Mark Valeri, eds. 55 (Spring 2010) 65-69.

HOKSBERGEN, Roland. Review of Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty. by Abhijit V. Banerjee and Esther Duflo. More than Good Intentions: How a New Economics is Helping to Solve Global Poverty. by Dean Karlan and Jacob Appel. 59 (Spring 2012) 65-72.

JOHNSON, Roger D.

JOHNSON, Roger D. Review of Economics of Good and Evil: The Quest for Economic Meaning from Gilgamesh to Wall Street. by Thomas Sedlacek. 59 (Spring 2012) 86-90.

KLAY, Robin. Review of Economic Justice in a Flat World: Christian Perspectives on Globalization. by Steven Rundle, ed. 56 (Fall 2010) 135-139.

KLAY, Robin. Review of Is the Market Moral? A Dialog on Religion, Economics and Justice by Rebecca Blank and William McGurn. 45 (Spring 2005) 59-62.

KOCH, Paul R. Review of Economy and Economic Analysis by Robert Black. 46 (Fall 2005) 59-61.

KROHN, Gregory A. Review of On Capitalism by Victor Nee and Richard Swedberg, eds. 52 (Fall 2008) 79-84.

LARRIVEE, John.

LARRIVEE, John. Review of Entrepreneurship in the Catholic Tradition. by Anthony Percy. 58 (Fall 2011) 95-101.

LEONARD, Kenneth L.

Review of Globalization and the Kingdom of God by Bob Goudzwaard. 41 (Spring 2003) 29-31.

LUNN, John. Review of God and Money: The Moral Challenge of Capitalism by Charles McDaniel, 51 (Spring 2008) 81-85

LUNN, John. Review of Slapped by the Invisible Hand: The Panic of 2007. by Gary B. Gorton. 58 (Fall 2011) 90-94.

MENZIES, Gordon and Trevor Thomas. Review of Economics for Life: An Economist Reflects on the Meaning of Life, Money, and What Really Matters. by Ian Harper. 58 (Fall 2011) 106-110.

MASON, John D. Review of Tight Fists or Open Hands? Wealth & Poverty in Old Testament Law. by David L. Baker. 57 (Spring 2011) 56-59.

MASON, John D. Review of The Fear of Beggars: Stewardship and Poverty in Christian Ethics by Kelly S. Johnson, 51 (Spring 2008) 91-95

MASON, John D. Review of The Anatomy of Racial Inequality, by Glenn C. Loury. 43 (Spring 2004), 10-12.

MASON, John D. Review of The Anatomy of Racial Inequality, by Glenn C. Loury. 43 (Spring 2004), 10-12.

MCMULLEN, Steven. Review of The Economics of Honor: Biblical Reflections on Money and Property. by Roelf Haan. 58 (Fall 2011) 102-105.

MCNAMARA, Paul E. Review of When Helping Hurts: How to Alleviate Poverty Without Hurting the Poor … and Yourself. by Steve Corbett and Brian Fikkert. 56 (Fall 2010) 140-144.

McNAMERA, Paul E. Review of Food Aid After Fifty Years: Recasting Its Role by Christopher B. Barrett and Daniel G. Maxwell, 47/48 (Spring/Fall 2006) 115-120

MITCHELL, Hadley T. Review of Turn Neither to the Right Nor to the Left: A Thinking Christian's Guide to Politics and Public Policy by D. Eric Schansberg. 46 (Fall 2005) 62-66.

NORTH, Charles M. Review of The Marketplace of Christianity by Robert B. Ekelund Jr., Robert F. Hebert, and Robert D. Tollison, 49 (Spring 2007) 56-60

OSLINGTON, Paul. Review of Bourgeois Dignity: Why Economics Cant't Explain the Modern World. by Deirdre McCloskey. 57 (Spring 2011) 60-64.

OSLINGTON, Paul. Review of The Bourgeois Virtues: Ethics for an Age of Commerce by Deidre McCloskey, 50 (Fall 2007) 132-136

OYELERE, Ruth Uwaifo. Review of New Directions in Development Ethics: Essays in Honor of Denis Goulet. Charles K. Wilber and Amitava Krishna Dutt, eds. 57 (Spring 2011) 68-72.

OYELERE, Ruth Uwaifo. Review of The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries Are Failing and What Can be Done About It by Pail Collier, 51 (Spring 2008) 86-90

PEACH, Nate. Review of Generous Justice: How God's Grace Makes Us Just. by Timothy Keller. 57 (Spring 2011) 73-76.

PEACH, Nate. Review of The Poor Will Be Glad: Joining the Revolution to Lift the World Out of Poverty. by Peter Greer and Phil Smith. 55 (Spring 2010) 70-73.

PUFFERT, Douglas. Review of "Are Economists Basically Immoral?" and Other Essays on Economics, Ethics, and Religion by Geoffrey Brennan and A.M.C. Waterman, eds. 54 (Fall 2009) 119-123.

RICHARDSON, J. David. Review of Globalization and Grace: A Christian Public Theology for a Global Future. by Max L. Stackhouse, ed. 56 (Fall 2010) 130-134.

RUNDLE, Steven L. Review of Globalization and the Good,  Peter Heslam, ed. 47/48 (Spring/Fall 2006) 136-141

RUSSEL, Mark L. Review of God at Work: The History and Promise of the Faith at Work Movement by David W. Miller, 49 (Spring 2007) 77-80.

SCHAEFER, Kurt C. Review of The Loss of Happiness in Market Democracies by Robert E. Lane. 41 (Spring 2003) 27-29.

SCHAEFER, Kurt C. Review of Remember the Poor: Paul Poverty and the Greco-Roman World. by Bruce W. Longenecker and Engagning Economics: New Testament Scenarios and Early Christian Reception. Bruce W. Longenecker and Kelly D. Liebengood, eds. 58 (Fall 2011) 73-82.

SCHAFFNER, Julie Anderson. Review of The White Man’s Burden: Why the West’s Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good by William Easterly, 49 (Spring 2007) 45-49.

SCHANSBERG, Eric. Review of Left, Right and Christ: Evangelical Faith in Politics. by Lisa Sharon Harper and David C. Innes. 59 (Spring 2012) 91-94.

SMITH, Stephen L.S. Review of Common Wealth: Economics for a Crowded Planet by Jeffrey D. Sachs 54 (Fall 2009) 113-118.

STAMM, K. Brad. Review of Foundations of Economics: A Christian View by Shawn Ritenour. 56 (Fall 2010) 148-152.

STAMM, K. Brad. Review of Calculated Futures: Theology, Ethics, and Economics by D. Stephen Long and Nancy Ruth Fox, with Tripp York 54 (Fall 2009) 128-132.

STAPLEFORD, John. Review of The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World by Niall Ferguson. 56 (Fall 2010) 145-147.

STAPLEFORD, John E. Review of The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth by Benjamin M. Friedman, 47/48 (Spring/Fall 2006) 142-146

STAPLEFORD, J. Review of "God and Business: Christianity's Case for Capitalism" by R. Richards. 42 (Fall 2003) 67-68.

STAPLEFORD, John. Review of The Elusive Quest for Growth: Economists' Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics by William Easterly. 45 (Spring 2005) 85-87.

STAPLEFORD, John. Review of Good Intentions: Nine Hot-Button Issues Viewed Through the Eyes of Faith by Charles M. North and Bob Smietana 54 (Fall 2009) 124-127.

STRINGHAM, Edward. Review of The Not So Wild, Wild West: Property Rights on the Frontier by Terry L. Anderson and Peter J. Hill, 47/48 (Spring/Fall 2006) 133-135

SURDYK, Lisa Klein. Review of Economics for Humans by Julie A. Nelson, 49 (Spring 2007) 66-70

TIEMSTRA, John P. Review of Gross National Happiness: Why Happiness Matters for America--And How We Can Get More of It by Arthur C. Brooks, 52 (Fall 2008) 71-74.

TIEMSTRA, John P. Review of Market Complicity and Christian Ethics. by Albino Barrera. 59 (Spring 2012) 78-81.

WATERMAN, A.M.C. "The True Wealth of Nations in Recent Catholic Social Thought: A Review Essay" Review of The True Wealth of Nations: Catholic Social Thought and Economic Life. Daniel K. Finn, ed. 57 (Spring 2011) 47-55.

WHAPLES, Robert. Review of Violence and Social Orders: A Conceptual Framework for Interpreting Recorded Human History. by Douglas C. North, John Joseph Wallis, and Barry R. Weingast. 55 (Spring 2010) 57-60.

WISHLOFF, Jim. Review of The Vocation of Business: Social Justice in the Marketplace by John C. Medaille, 51 (Spring 2008)

WOERHLING, Francis. Review of Economic Compulsion and Christian Ethics by Albino Barrera, 51 (Spring 2008) 105-109

Editor’s Note: We’re pleased to introduce a guest writer on the IFWE blog today, Zach (In Seong) Kim–a student from Northwest Nazarene University who recently attended a student-sponsored event on campus featuring Doug Bandow, a contributor to IFWE’s latest book, Counting the Cost: Christian Perspectives on Capitalism. Referencing his chapter in Counting the Cost, Doug presented capitalism as “history’s best anti-poverty program.”

According to a Harvard University survey, 51 percent of young adults between the ages of 18 and 29 do not support capitalism. Many millennials feel that capitalism causes more harm than good. In his essay “Capitalism and Poverty: Economic Development and Growth Benefit the Least the Most” in the new book, Counting the Cost: Christian Perspectives on Capitalism, Doug Bandow, however, challenges this prevailing viewpoint using historical data on capitalism’s economic and non-economic benefits. Although capitalism is not a sufficient solution to the problems of humanity, it creates a conducive environment for more work to be done by people of faith to promote human flourishing.

After reading Counting the Cost and listening to Doug Bandow’s recent lecture at Northwest Nazarene University, I contend that capitalism is the best system in which to practice the Christian faith.

Freedom of choice facilitated through the adoption of capitalism allows for more religious freedom. The world may lack perfect laissez-fair economies. Most countries, however, have adopted policies based on the fundamentals of capitalism, where people can freely decide where they want to work and on what terms.

Based on Doug’s arguments and my own life experiences, I believe the following is true about capitalism as an economic system:

1. Lack of Religious Freedom Impacts Other Freedoms

Living in the United States, we may find it difficult to comprehend how government institutions can impact the freedom to make fundamental decisions about your life. In Iraq or North Korea, Christians pay a great price to practice their faith. A young professional in Iraq, for example, fled his home after he heard that ISIS had put a bounty on him for being Christian. Our sisters and brothers in faith still face persecution today. In fact, Dr. Bandow reports that in North Korea, “since 1953, at least 200,000 Christians have gone missing.” Missing! In countries like North Korea, where the authoritarian government exerts its influence on most aspects of people’s lives, people not only lack the freedom to choose their occupation but also their religion. Sure, North Korea may be an extreme case, but religious persecution still occurs all over the world.

2. Economic Freedom and Growth Fosters Religious Freedom

The inverse is also true: a society with more economic freedom and less government involvement encourages the freedom of religion. China provides an example of this. China has seen enormous economic growth in the past couple decades. As the economy has moved further away from central planning, the Chinese people have enjoyed an increased freedom to choose—in many areas of their lives.

Growing up in the mission fields in China, I personally witnessed a transition in people’s standard of living during this time. In the ‘90s, when I was a little boy, I would often help my parents prepare huge meals to feed the church. Ten years later, the same congregation we fed started regularly inviting us to eat at the fanciest restaurants in China. The poor we were helping to feed started feeding us. The data in Bandow’s essay, in fact, reflects this impact. He reports that “between 1961 and 2000, per capita calories per day increased by 39 percent in the developing world. The increase for China was 61 percent.”

It is hard to ignore the connection between religious and economic freedom. Freedoms build on one another—where one is lacking, others are lacking; and where one gains a foothold, other freedoms follow. From this experience, it seems that the less authoritative a government is, the more freedom and resources people have to practice their faith.

3. The Freedom Capitalism Brings Comes with Responsibilities

The success story of capitalism, however, now introduces new challenges to Christians. In capitalism, people are free to act out of love instead of duty.

The overall rhetoric of socialism is that people should act out of duty. For example, when a government mandates that its citizens pay more taxes to support the elderly, people no longer help senior citizens out of concern for them but rather out of duty. The government persuades people to transfer the responsibility of loving and caring for others to the state. However, these policies have not worked. Bandow points out that overall happiness levels of a country do not increase through income redistribution but rather through an overall increase in absolute per capita income.

Christians living in a free society should help those in need out of love. Bandow writes, “Although increasing economic success is a huge human benefit, it places new responsibilities on Christians.” Indeed, we cannot know and have compassion for the problems of our neighbors without asking and being in a relationship with them.

Policy changes in China have certainly brought more economic freedom, as well as religious and political freedom. Politics, however, is not the only avenue for change. Ultimately, freedom, coupled with conscience nurtured by religion, helps societies and economies advance. Bandow challenges Christians to become the moral agents in a free economy. Christians should not depend on the government to execute things of moral responsibility. Though it may not be a perfect system, economic freedom and capitalism might be the best way forward.

To my fellow Christian millennials, we might want to start accepting that capitalism has allowed us to freely act upon our beliefs and vocational gifts, and that we need to start tackling the new challenges we face as Christians in a free society.

Editor’s note: Read Doug Bandow’s essay on capitalism, poverty, and economic development in Counting the Cost: Christian Perspectives on Capitalism.

Help more people understand the biblical and economic principles that lead to a flourishing society! Support IFWE today. 

© 2018 Institute for Faith, Work & Economics. All rights reserved. Printed from http://tifwe.org/how-to-be-productive-in-2014/. For reprint permissions, contact info@tifwe.org.

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